Atheist Base
The tree disobeyed him! http://bit.ly/MUjj3X

The tree disobeyed him! http://bit.ly/MUjj3X

Damn Straight http://bit.ly/M1codd

Damn Straight http://bit.ly/M1codd

Pizza: more popular than God? http://bit.ly/KhUHTo

Pizza: more popular than God? http://bit.ly/KhUHTo

proud of pissing off One Million Moms http://bit.ly/JZB1IH

proud of pissing off One Million Moms http://bit.ly/JZB1IH

Bible: Plot summary http://bit.ly/L4sXUe

Bible: Plot summary http://bit.ly/L4sXUe

God is my constant http://bit.ly/JVLIXX

God is my constant http://bit.ly/JVLIXX

A relationship with Jesus http://bit.ly/KTDUpA

A relationship with Jesus http://bit.ly/KTDUpA

You misspelled Steve Jobs http://bit.ly/IyWXER

You misspelled Steve Jobs http://bit.ly/IyWXER

Why don’t people believe in God? http://bit.ly/JLQFGE

Why don’t people believe in God? http://bit.ly/JLQFGE

Two men jailed for posting pictures of Mohammad on Facebook

Tarek Amara, Reuters reports:

Two young Tunisians have been sentenced to seven years in prison for posting cartoons of the prophet Mohammad on Facebook, in a case that has fueled allegations the country’s new Islamist leaders are gagging free speech.

[caption id=”attachment_409” align=”aligncenter” width=”450” caption=”An illustration picture shows the log-on screen for the website Facebook, in Munich February 2, 2012. REUTERS/Michael Dalder”]An illustration picture shows the log-on screen for the website Facebook, in Munich February 2, 2012. REUTERS/Michael Dalder[/caption]

The two men had posted depictions of the prophet naked on the social networking site, the justice ministry said, inflaming sensitivities in a country where Muslim values have taken on a bigger role since a revolution last year.

"They were sentenced … to seven years in prison for violation of morality, and disturbing public order," said Chokri Nefti, a justice ministry spokesman.

One of the two, Jabeur Mejri is in jail while the second, Ghazi Beji, is still being sought by police and was sentenced in absentia.

The sentence was handed down on March 28 but was not reported until Thursday, when bloggers started posting information about the case on the Internet.

"The sentences are very heavy and severe, even if these young people were at fault," one Tunisian blogger, Nebil Zagdoud, told Reuters.

"This decision is aimed at silencing freedom of expression even on the Internet. Prosecutions for offending morals are a proxy for this government to gag everyone."

Tunisia electrified the Arab world in January last year when protests forced its autocratic president, Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali, to flee the country. In their first democratic election, Tunisians elected a government led by moderate Islamists.

The revolution also brought tension between conservative Muslims who believe their faith should have a bigger role in public life, and secularists who say freedom of expression and women’s’ rights are now under attack.

Read more: Reuters

Original Article